Indonesia Democracy Index Measure of Democratic Achievements

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Jakarta, 30 November 2016 - The Indonesia Democracy Index (IDI) has been a feature of the country’s democracy since 2009. Supported by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), the Index measures the performance of Indonesia’s democratic institutions and systems. The 2015 report was launched today by the Coordinating Minister for Political, Legal and Security Affairs Wiranto.

Indonesia’s willingness to openly scrutinize its democracy is a sign of its democratic maturity, UNDP Indonesia Country Director Christophe Bahuet said at the launch event.

The Index assigns scores of 0 to 100 based on 28 indicators that relate to civil freedom, political rights and democratic institutions. Scores from 0-59 are categorized as “poor”, 60-80 are “moderate,” and above 80 are “good.” Data are also available at the provincial level for a more refined analysis, and are prepared by a team of independent experts

The national score for 2015 is 72,82, lower than 73,04 in the previous year. It is not a cause for an excessive alarm because some of the indicators have changed. While the changing methodology makes it difficult to measure progress and retreat, the Index is useful to show where improvements need to be made in order to strengthen democracy and democratic behavior. For instance, the Index shows that the “threat to use violence by the community” has increased.

In UNDP’s view the IDI is of particular value in three respects. It offers data for anyone interested in the state of democracy in Indonesia, which allows for a transparent evaluation and public scrutiny.

Second, the Government and the people of Indonesia can gain a better understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of the country’s democracy by publicly discussing the findings of the report.

And third, the discussions about the findings can help identify actions that need to be taken at policy level. The IDI has been used in the current and previous national development plans (RPJMN) and 11 regional development plans (RPJMD).

For the list of indicators and scores, see here.

Here is the speech of UNDP Indonesia Country Director Christophe Bahuet at the launch event and award ceremony for the best performing provinces.

 

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Distinguished ladies and gentlemen,

Good morning.

I feel very honoured to be invited on behalf of UNDP to attend the launch of the Indonesian Democracy Index (IDI) this morning and to have been asked by the organizers to say a few words. Thank you very much for including UNDP in this national ceremony. 

Since 2009 UNDP has been the partner of the Government for the Indonesia Democracy Index. We believe that the IDI has already become a success story and has demonstrated its value in the building of democracy in Indonesia at both the national and the local level.

The IDI is a national product, produced by national stakeholders and led by a group of experts that make up the independent expert panel. The Index is important as it provides valuable information and data about the state of democracy in Indonesia.

I believe that it is a sign of democratic maturity for a Government and a society to be willing to openly scrutinize its democracy and measure the performance of its institutions and systems. Democracy -even in countries with the longest standing democratic traditions- can never been taken for granted. Democracy evolves with strength and weaknesses. It makes gain and it also experiences reversal. Democracy needs to be protected, defended and improved for the benefit of the people and the stability of the country.  

The Indonesian Democracy Index can be a most valuable tool to achieve this. It has 28 indicators that relates to three essential dimension of democracy, namely civil freedom, political rights and democratic institutions. It also offers disaggregated data at the provincial level for a more refined analysis.

As a first step, the Index offers a wealth of data and information for the central and local Government, the media, citizens and anyone interested in the state of democracy in Indonesia at both national and provincial level.

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As a second step, it is important that the findings of the Index be presented and publicly discussed to capture different perspectives and gain a better understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of the Indonesian democracy. Today’s launch is very important precisely because it offers a first opportunity to have this discussion at the national level on the 2015 IDI. I therefore want to particularly thank the Coordinating Ministry for Politics, Law and Security for organizing this launch and all of you for your presence today.  Then as done in previous years, the dissemination of the 2015 IDI across Indonesia should be undertaken and UNDP looks forward to cooperating with many of you to conduct this dissemination.  

As a third step, the Index and discussions about the findings can be instrumental to identify measures and actions that can be taken at policy level. The Indonesia Democracy Index is being used for that purpose by the central and local Governments. DI has been used in the current and previous RPJMN as one of development targets. In addition eleven provinces have incorporated IDI into their RPJMD and RKPD and we hope that this number will grow. The IDI can also be used within communities to strengthen democracy and democratic behavior.  For instance, this will be needed to address the IDI indicator “threat to use violence by the community”, which deteriorated from 62.12 to 46.69 between 2014 and 2015. 

Ladies and Gentlemen,

Indonesia can be proud of its democratic achievements and of its openness to measure and discuss the state of its democracy through the IDI. Not every country does so. I would therefore like to express our appreciation to the Coordinating Ministry for Politics, Law and Security which has taken the lead in the process of constructing and using this index. Our thanks also go to Bappenas for its strong commitment to this process from the beginning of our work on the Index; and to the National Statistics Office (BPS) for its contribution in refining the index and conducting the data collection, and to the Ministry of Home Affairs which led the establishment of the provincial working groups to guide the work at the provincial level. I also want to recognize DFAT Australia for its financial contribution to the project. Finally, let me also thank the IDI expert team which has worked so hard to produce the Index and express our sincere gratitude to Prof. Maswadi Rauf, Prof. Siti Musdah Mulia, Dr. Syarif Hidayat, and Dr. Malik Gismar. 

Under the strong cooperation that exists between UNDP and the Republic of Indonesia, UNDP stand ready to continue working with all of you in Jakarta and in all the provinces not only to measure democracy, but to strengthen it throughout Indonesia.

Thank you.

 

Contact Information

Alice Budisatrijo
Communications Specialist
+62 811 8824 358

 

 

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